pubmed: meniscus and stem ce...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=meniscus and stem cell treatment
NCBI pubmed
  • Cartilage repair in vivo: the role of migratory progenitor cells.
    Related Articles

    Cartilage repair in vivo: the role of migratory progenitor cells.

    Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2014 Nov;16(11):461

    Authors: Schminke B, Miosge N

    Abstract
    The most common diseases of the joints and its tissues are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, with osteoarthritis being anticipated to be the fourth leading cause of disability by the year 2020. To date, no truly causal therapies are available, and this has promoted tissue engineering attempts mainly involving mesenchymal stem cells. The goal of all tissue repairs would be to restore a fully functional tissue, here a hyaline articular cartilage. The hyaline cartilage is the most affected in osteoarthritis, where altered cell-matrix interactions gradually destroy tissue integrity. In rheumatoid arthritis, the inflammatory aspect is more important, and the cartilage tissue is destroyed by the invasion of tumor-like pannus tissue arising from the inflamed synovia. Furthermore, the fibrocartilage of the meniscus is clearly involved in the initiation of osteoarthritis, especially after trauma. Recent investigations have highlighted the role of migratory progenitor cells found in diseased tissues in situ. In osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, these chondrogenic progenitor cells are involved in regeneration efforts that are largely unsuccessful in diseased cartilage tissue. However, these progenitor cells are interesting targets for a cell-based regenerative therapy for joint diseases.

    PMID: 25240685 [PubMed - in process]

pubmed: meniscus and stem ce...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=meniscus and stem cell treatment
NCBI pubmed
  • Cartilage repair in vivo: the role of migratory progenitor cells.
    Related Articles

    Cartilage repair in vivo: the role of migratory progenitor cells.

    Curr Rheumatol Rep. 2014 Nov;16(11):461

    Authors: Schminke B, Miosge N

    Abstract
    The most common diseases of the joints and its tissues are osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, with osteoarthritis being anticipated to be the fourth leading cause of disability by the year 2020. To date, no truly causal therapies are available, and this has promoted tissue engineering attempts mainly involving mesenchymal stem cells. The goal of all tissue repairs would be to restore a fully functional tissue, here a hyaline articular cartilage. The hyaline cartilage is the most affected in osteoarthritis, where altered cell-matrix interactions gradually destroy tissue integrity. In rheumatoid arthritis, the inflammatory aspect is more important, and the cartilage tissue is destroyed by the invasion of tumor-like pannus tissue arising from the inflamed synovia. Furthermore, the fibrocartilage of the meniscus is clearly involved in the initiation of osteoarthritis, especially after trauma. Recent investigations have highlighted the role of migratory progenitor cells found in diseased tissues in situ. In osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis, these chondrogenic progenitor cells are involved in regeneration efforts that are largely unsuccessful in diseased cartilage tissue. However, these progenitor cells are interesting targets for a cell-based regenerative therapy for joint diseases.

    PMID: 25240685 [PubMed - in process]