pubmed: meniscus and stem ce...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=meniscus and stem cell treatment
NCBI pubmed
  • A Radiopaque Electrospun Scaffold for Engineering Fibrous Musculoskeletal Tissues: Scaffold Characterization and In Vivo Applications.
    Related Articles

    A Radiopaque Electrospun Scaffold for Engineering Fibrous Musculoskeletal Tissues: Scaffold Characterization and In Vivo Applications.

    Acta Biomater. 2015 Aug 3;

    Authors: Martin JT, Milby AH, Ikuta K, Poudel S, Pfeifer CG, Elliott DM, Smith HE, Mauck RL

    Abstract
    Tissue engineering strategies have emerged in response to the growing prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal conditions, and many of these regenerative methods are currently being evaluated in translational animal models. Engineered replacements for fibrous tissues such as the meniscus, annulus fibrosus, tendons, and ligaments are subjected to challenging physiologic loads, and are difficult to track in vivo using standard techniques. The diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions depends heavily on radiographic assessment, and a number of currently available implants utilize radiopaque markers to facilitate in vivo imaging. In this study, we developed a nanofibrous scaffold in which individual fibers included radiopaque nanoparticles. Inclusion of radiopaque particles increased the tensile modulus of the scaffold and imparted radiation attenuation within the range of cortical bone. When scaffolds were seeded with bovine mesenchymal stem cells in vitro, there was no change in cell proliferation and no evidence of promiscuous conversion to an osteogenic phenotype. Scaffolds were implanted ex vivo in a model of a meniscal tear in a bovine joint and in vivo in a model of total disc replacement in the rat coccygeal spine (tail), and were visualized via fluoroscopy and microcomputed tomography. In the disc replacement model, histological analysis at 4 weeks showed that the scaffold was biocompatible and supported the deposition of fibrous tissue in vivo. Thus, nanofibrous scaffolds including radiopaque nanoparticles provide a biocompatible template with sufficient radiopacity for in vivo visualization in both small and large animal models. This radiopacity may facilitate image-guided implantation and non-invasive long-term evaluation of scaffold location and performance.

    PMID: 26248165 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

pubmed: meniscus and stem ce...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=meniscus and stem cell treatment
NCBI pubmed
  • A Radiopaque Electrospun Scaffold for Engineering Fibrous Musculoskeletal Tissues: Scaffold Characterization and In Vivo Applications.
    Related Articles

    A Radiopaque Electrospun Scaffold for Engineering Fibrous Musculoskeletal Tissues: Scaffold Characterization and In Vivo Applications.

    Acta Biomater. 2015 Aug 3;

    Authors: Martin JT, Milby AH, Ikuta K, Poudel S, Pfeifer CG, Elliott DM, Smith HE, Mauck RL

    Abstract
    Tissue engineering strategies have emerged in response to the growing prevalence of chronic musculoskeletal conditions, and many of these regenerative methods are currently being evaluated in translational animal models. Engineered replacements for fibrous tissues such as the meniscus, annulus fibrosus, tendons, and ligaments are subjected to challenging physiologic loads, and are difficult to track in vivo using standard techniques. The diagnosis and treatment of musculoskeletal conditions depends heavily on radiographic assessment, and a number of currently available implants utilize radiopaque markers to facilitate in vivo imaging. In this study, we developed a nanofibrous scaffold in which individual fibers included radiopaque nanoparticles. Inclusion of radiopaque particles increased the tensile modulus of the scaffold and imparted radiation attenuation within the range of cortical bone. When scaffolds were seeded with bovine mesenchymal stem cells in vitro, there was no change in cell proliferation and no evidence of promiscuous conversion to an osteogenic phenotype. Scaffolds were implanted ex vivo in a model of a meniscal tear in a bovine joint and in vivo in a model of total disc replacement in the rat coccygeal spine (tail), and were visualized via fluoroscopy and microcomputed tomography. In the disc replacement model, histological analysis at 4 weeks showed that the scaffold was biocompatible and supported the deposition of fibrous tissue in vivo. Thus, nanofibrous scaffolds including radiopaque nanoparticles provide a biocompatible template with sufficient radiopacity for in vivo visualization in both small and large animal models. This radiopacity may facilitate image-guided implantation and non-invasive long-term evaluation of scaffold location and performance.

    PMID: 26248165 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]