pubmed: alzheimer's and stem...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=alzheimer's and stem cell therapy
NCBI pubmed
  • Evaluation of neuroprotective effect of glucagon-like peptide 1 analogs using neuroimaging.
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    Evaluation of neuroprotective effect of glucagon-like peptide 1 analogs using neuroimaging.

    Alzheimers Dement. 2014 Feb;10(1 Suppl):S55-61

    Authors: Femminella GD, Edison P

    Abstract
    There is increasing evidence to suggest that glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP1) analogs are neuroprotective in animal models. In transgenic mice, both insulin and GLP1 analogs reduced inflammation, increased stem cell proliferation, reduced apoptosis, and increased dendritic growth. Furthermore, insulin desensitization was also observed in these animals, and reduced glucose uptake in the brain, as shown on FDG-PET imaging. In this review we discussed the role of PET and MRI in evaluating the effect of GLP1 analogs in disease progression in both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. We have also discussed the potential novel PET markers that will allow us to understand the mechanism by which GLP1 exerts its effects.

    PMID: 24529526 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

pubmed: alzheimer's and stem...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=alzheimer's and stem cell treatment
NCBI pubmed
  • Intranasal delivery of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, macrophages, and microglia to the brain in mouse models of Alzheimer?s and Parkinson?s disease.

    Intranasal delivery of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells, macrophages, and microglia to the brain in mouse models of Alzheimer?s and Parkinson?s disease.

    Cell Transplant. 2014 Oct 9;

    Authors: Danielyan L, Beer-Hammer S, Stolzing A, Sch Fer R, Siegel G, Fabian C, Kahle P, Biedermann T, Lourhmati A, Buadze M, Novakovic A, Proksch B, Gleiter CH, Ii WH, Schwab M

    Abstract
    In view of the rapid preclinical development of cell-based therapies for neurodegenerative disorders, traumatic brain injury, and tumors, the safe and efficient delivery and targeting of therapeutic cells to the central nervous system is critical for maintaining therapeutic efficacy and safety in the respective disease models. Our previous data demonstrated therapeutically efficacious and targeted delivery of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to the brain in the rat 6-hydroxydopamine model of Parkinson?s disease (PD). The present study examined delivery of bone marrow derived MSCs, macrophages, and microglia to the brain in a transgenic model of PD ((Thy1)-h[A30P] αS) and an APP/PS1 model of Alzheimer?s disease (AD) via intranasal application (INA). INA of microglia in na?ve BL/6 mice led to targeted and effective delivery of cells to the brain. Quantitative PCR analysis of eGFP DNA showed that the brain contained the highest amount of eGFP-microglia (up to 2.1x10(4)) after INA of 1x10(6) cells, while the total amount of cells detected in peripheral organs did not exceed 3.4x10(3). Seven days after INA, MSCs expressing eGFP were detected in the olfactory bulb (OB), cortex, amygdala, striatum, hippocampus, cerebellum, and brainstem of (Thy1)-h[A30P] αS transgenic mice, showing predominant distribution within the OB and brainstem. INA of eGFP-expressing macrophages in 13 month-old APP/PS1 mice led to delivery of cells to the OB, hippocampus, cortex, and cerebellum. Both, MSCs and macrophages contained Iba-1-positive population of small microglia-like cells and Iba-1-negative large rounded cells showing either intracellular Amyloid beta (macrophages in APP/PS1 model) or α-Synuclein (MSCs in (Thy1)-h[A30P] αS model) immunoreactivity. Here we show, for the first time, intranasal delivery of cells to the brain of transgenic PD and AD mouse models. Additional work is needed to determine the optimal dosage (single treatment regimen or repeated administrations) to achieve functional improvement in these mouse models with intranasal microglia/macrophages and MSCs. This manuscript is published as part of the International Association of Neurorestoratology (IANR) special issue of Cell Transplantation.

    PMID: 25302802 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]