Stroke Stem Cell TherapyStroke Stem Cell Treatment

pubmed: stroke and stem cell...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=stroke and stem cell therapy
NCBI pubmed
  • Juxtacerebral Tissue Regeneration Potential: Telocytes Contribution.
    Related Articles

    Juxtacerebral Tissue Regeneration Potential: Telocytes Contribution.

    Adv Exp Med Biol. 2016;913:397-402

    Authors: Ceafalan LC, Popescu BO

    Abstract
    It is well proved already that neurogenesis does take place in mammals' brain, including human brain. However, neurogenesis by itself is not able to compensate for brain tissue loss in serious neurological diseases, such as stroke, brain trauma or neurodegenerative disorders. Recent evidences show that neural stem cell niches are present not only in classical locations, such as subventricularor subgranular zones, but in other areas as well, including tissues contiguous to the brain (meninges and choroid plexus).In this chapter we revise the relationship of neural stem cells with interstitial cells (mainly telocytes), which we think is significant, and we describe what is known about the juxtacerebral tissue neurogenesis potential.

    PMID: 27796901 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells: intra-arterial versus intravenous administration impacts stroke outcomes in a murine model.
    Related Articles

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells: intra-arterial versus intravenous administration impacts stroke outcomes in a murine model.

    Transl Res. 2016 Oct;176:69-80

    Authors: Kasahara Y, Yamahara K, Soma T, Stern DM, Nakagomi T, Matsuyama T, Taguchi A

    Abstract
    Based on results of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in animal models of stroke, clinical trials with hematopoietic stem cells administered intra-arterially or intravenously have been initiated in patients. Although intra-arterial injection is expected to deliver transplanted cells more directly to the ischemic tissue, the optimal route for enhancing clinical outcomes has not been identified in the setting of stroke. In this study, we compared the therapeutic potential of intra-arterial versus intravenous injection of bone marrow derived-mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and CD133-positive (CD133(+)) cells in a murine stroke model. We have found that intra-arterial injection of BM-MNCs exaggerates inflammation with accompanying loss of microvascular structures in poststroke brain and no improvement in cortical function. In contrast, intravenous injection of BM-MNCs did not similarly enhance inflammation and improved cortical function. Our results indicate that the optimal route of cell transplantation can vary with different cell populations and highlight possible issues that might arise with intra-arterial cell administration for acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease.

    PMID: 27164406 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

pubmed: stroke and stem cell...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=stroke and stem cell treatment
NCBI pubmed
  • Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Promotes Proliferation, Differentiation, and Migration of Neural Stem Cells via BDNF Upregulation.
    Related Articles

    Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Promotes Proliferation, Differentiation, and Migration of Neural Stem Cells via BDNF Upregulation.

    PLoS One. 2016;11(11):e0165460

    Authors: Lee WD, Wang KC, Tsai YF, Chou PC, Tsai LK, Chien CL

    Abstract
    Patients who suffer from subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) usually have long-term neurological impairments. Endogenous neurogenesis might play a potential role in functional recovery after SAH; however, the underlying neurogenesis mechanism is still unclear. We assessed the extent of neurogenesis in the subventricular zone (SVZ) to better understand the neurogenesis mechanism after SAH. We performed a rat model of SAH to examine the extent of neurogenesis in the SVZ and assessed functional effects of the neurotrophic factors in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) on neural stem cells (NSCs) after SAH. In this study, the proliferation, differentiation, and migratory capacities of NSCs in the SVZ were significantly increased on days 5 and 7 post SAH. Furthermore, treatment of cultured rat fetal NSCs with the CSF collected from rats on days 5 and 7 post SAH enhanced their proliferation, differentiation, and migration. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of the CSF detected a marked increase in the concentration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Treating the cultured NSCs with recombinant BDNF (at the same concentration as that in the CSF) or with CSF from SAH rats, directly, stimulated proliferation, differentiation, and migration to a similar extent. BDNF expression was upregulated in the SVZ of rats on days 5 and 7 post SAH, and BDNF release occurred from NSCs, astrocytes, and microglia in the SVZ. These results indicate that SAH triggers the expression of BDNF, which promotes the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of NSCs in the SVZ after SAH.

    PMID: 27832087 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Juxtacerebral Tissue Regeneration Potential: Telocytes Contribution.
    Related Articles

    Juxtacerebral Tissue Regeneration Potential: Telocytes Contribution.

    Adv Exp Med Biol. 2016;913:397-402

    Authors: Ceafalan LC, Popescu BO

    Abstract
    It is well proved already that neurogenesis does take place in mammals' brain, including human brain. However, neurogenesis by itself is not able to compensate for brain tissue loss in serious neurological diseases, such as stroke, brain trauma or neurodegenerative disorders. Recent evidences show that neural stem cell niches are present not only in classical locations, such as subventricularor subgranular zones, but in other areas as well, including tissues contiguous to the brain (meninges and choroid plexus).In this chapter we revise the relationship of neural stem cells with interstitial cells (mainly telocytes), which we think is significant, and we describe what is known about the juxtacerebral tissue neurogenesis potential.

    PMID: 27796901 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

  • Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells: intra-arterial versus intravenous administration impacts stroke outcomes in a murine model.
    Related Articles

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells: intra-arterial versus intravenous administration impacts stroke outcomes in a murine model.

    Transl Res. 2016 Oct;176:69-80

    Authors: Kasahara Y, Yamahara K, Soma T, Stern DM, Nakagomi T, Matsuyama T, Taguchi A

    Abstract
    Based on results of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in animal models of stroke, clinical trials with hematopoietic stem cells administered intra-arterially or intravenously have been initiated in patients. Although intra-arterial injection is expected to deliver transplanted cells more directly to the ischemic tissue, the optimal route for enhancing clinical outcomes has not been identified in the setting of stroke. In this study, we compared the therapeutic potential of intra-arterial versus intravenous injection of bone marrow derived-mononuclear cells (BM-MNCs) and CD133-positive (CD133(+)) cells in a murine stroke model. We have found that intra-arterial injection of BM-MNCs exaggerates inflammation with accompanying loss of microvascular structures in poststroke brain and no improvement in cortical function. In contrast, intravenous injection of BM-MNCs did not similarly enhance inflammation and improved cortical function. Our results indicate that the optimal route of cell transplantation can vary with different cell populations and highlight possible issues that might arise with intra-arterial cell administration for acute ischemic cerebrovascular disease.

    PMID: 27164406 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]