pubmed: erectile dysfunction...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=Erectile dysfunction and Stem Cell Therapy
NCBI pubmed
  • Current Perspectives on Stem Cell Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction.
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    Current Perspectives on Stem Cell Therapy for Erectile Dysfunction.

    Sex Med Rev. 2016 Jul;4(3):247-256

    Authors: Peak TC, Anaissie J, Hellstrom WJ

    Abstract
    INTRODUCTION: Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common sexual disorder that affects the lives of millions of male patients and their partners. Various medical and surgical therapies exist, with the most common being oral intake of phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors. One therapeutic strategy in preclinical development to treat ED is stem cell transplantation.
    AIM: To examine the studies that have investigated stem cells for the treatment of ED.
    METHODS: A literature review was performed through PubMed focusing on stem cells and ED.
    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: An assessment of different types of stem cells and how they may be applied therapeutically in the treatment of ED.
    RESULTS: The stem cell types that have been investigated for the treatment of ED include bone marrow-derived mesenchymal, adipose-derived, muscle-derived, testes, urine-derived, neural crest, and endothelial progenitor. Depending on the cell type, research has demonstrated that with transplantation, stem cells exert a paracrine effect on penile tissue, and can differentiate into smooth muscle, endothelium, and neurons.
    CONCLUSION: Multiple stem cell lines are currently being studied for their potential to treat ED. To date, stem cells have proven safe and effective in both animal and human models of ED. More research is needed to understand their full therapeutic potential.

    PMID: 27871958 [PubMed - in process]

pubmed: erectile dysfunction...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=Erectile dysfunction and Stem Cell Treatment
NCBI pubmed
  • B Cell Lymphoma-2-Modified Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation for the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus-Induced Erectile Dysfunction in a Rat Model.

    B Cell Lymphoma-2-Modified Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplantation for the Treatment of Diabetes Mellitus-Induced Erectile Dysfunction in a Rat Model.

    Urol Int. 2016 Nov 29;

    Authors: Sun X, Luo LH, Feng L, Li DS, Zhong KZ

    Abstract
    OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to explore the effects of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)-modified bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) transplantation for the treatment of diabetes mellitus-induced erectile dysfunction (DMED) in a rat model.
    METHODS: The DMED rat model was successfully established. Thirty-six DMED rats were assigned into the Bcl-2-BMSCs, null-BMSCs, BMSCs and phosphate buffered saline (PBS) groups. Meanwhile, 9 normal rats injected with PBS were taken as the normal control group.
    RESULTS: In the Bcl-2-BMSCs group, the average times of erection, rate of erection, peak intra-cavernous pressure (ICP) and peak ICP/mean arterial pressure were higher than those in the null-BMSCs, BMSCs and PBS groups, but were lower than those in the normal control group. In the Bcl-2-BMSCs group, capillary vessels and Bcl-2 mRNA and protein expressions were similar to those in the normal control group, while they were higher than those in other groups.
    CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that Bcl-2-modified BMSC transplantation could improve erectile function in DMED rats.

    PMID: 27894122 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

  • Antiplasmodial activity of Heinsia crinita (Rubiaceae) and identification of new iridoids.

    Antiplasmodial activity of Heinsia crinita (Rubiaceae) and identification of new iridoids.

    J Ethnopharmacol. 2016 Nov 24;:

    Authors: Tshisekedi Tshibangu P, Mutwale Kapepula P, Kabongo Kapinga MJ, Tujibikila Mukuta A, Kalenda DT, Tchinda AT, Mouithys-Mickalad AA, Jansen O, Cieckiewicz E, Tits M, Angenot L, Frédérich M

    Abstract
    ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Heinsia crinita is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of febrile illness and erectile dysfunction. Its stem bark powder is found in some peripheral markets in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) as a remedy against malaria. Investigations were conducted on crude extracts of leaves, fruits and stem barks in view to validate their use and to determine which plant part possesses the best antiplasmodial properties.
    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Different plant parts were extracted with methanol, ethanol and dichloromethane. Based on the preliminary assays, the dichloromethane extract of the stem bark was subjected to fractionation using preparative HPLC system and column chromatography. This step led to the isolation of two new iridoids which had their structures elucidated by NMR, UV, MS and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. Extracts and pure compounds were tested in vitro against the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. The inhibition of the parasite growth was evaluated in vitro by colorimetric method (p-LDH assay) and their cytotoxicity evaluated in vitro against the human non-cancer fibroblast cell line (WI38) through WST1 assay. The in vivo antiplasmodial activity was assessed by the inhibition of Plasmodium berghei growth in infected mice treated with the ethanol extract of H. crinita stem bark at the concentrations of 200 and 300mg/Kg/day per os, using a protocol based on the 4-day suppressive test of Peters and compared to a non-treated negative control group of mice (growth = 100%). Finally the antioxidant activity of the same extract was evaluated using ABTS, DPPH and cell-based assays.
    RESULTS: A moderate in vitro antiplasmodial activity was observed for the dichloromethane extract of the stem bark of H. crinita (IC50 = 29.2 ± 1.39µg/mL) and for the two new iridoids, lamalbide 6, 7, 8- triacetate (IC50 = 16.39 ± 0.43µg/mL) as well as for its aglycone lamiridosin 6, 7, 8-triacetate (IC50 =.44.56 ± 1.12µg/mL). The ethanolic stem bark extract (200 and 300mg/kg/day, oral route) showed a moderate in vivo antimalarial activity in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice with 27.84 ± 2.75% and 48.54 ± 3.76% of inhibition of the parasite growth, respectively (p < 0.01).). This extract displayed high cellular antioxidant activity using dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFDA) on HL-60 monocytes. These crude extracts and pure compounds tested at the higher concentration of 100µg/mL did not show any cytotoxicity against WI38 cells.
    CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that H. crinita extracts possess antimalarial activity and contain some unusual iridoids with moderate antiplasmodial activity, therefore justifying to some extent its traditional use by the local population in DRC for this purpose. This is the first report of the isolation and antiplasmodial activity of these two new iridoids.

    PMID: 27890637 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]