pubmed: erectile dysfunction...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=Erectile dysfunction and Stem Cell Therapy
NCBI pubmed
  • A survey of fertility and sexual health following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in New South Wales, Australia.
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    A survey of fertility and sexual health following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in New South Wales, Australia.

    Br J Haematol. 2016 Feb;172(4):592-601

    Authors: Dyer G, Gilroy N, Bradford J, Brice L, Kabir M, Greenwood M, Larsen SR, Moore J, Hertzberg M, Kwan J, Brown L, Hogg M, Huang G, Tan J, Ward C, Kerridge I

    Abstract
    Four hundred and twenty-one adult allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) survivors participated in a cross-sectional study to assess sexual dysfunction and infertility post-transplant. Survey instruments included the Sydney Post-Blood and Marrow Transplant (BMT) Survey, Functional Assessment of Cancer Treatment (FACT) - BMT, the Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scales (DASS 21), the Chronic Graft-versus-Host Disease (cGVHD) Activity Assessment- Patient Self Report (Form B), the Lee cGVHD Symptom Scale and The Post-Traumatic Growth Inventory. Most HSCT survivors reported sexual difficulties (51% of males; 66% of females). Men reported erectile dysfunction (79%) and decreased libido (61·6%) and women reported loss of libido (83%), painful intercourse (73%) and less enjoyment of sex (68%). Women also commonly reported vaginal dryness (73%), vaginal narrowing (34%) and vaginal irritation (26%). Woman had much higher rates of genital cGvHD than men (22% vs. 5%). Age and cGVHD were significantly associated with sexual dysfunction. Few survivors had children following transplant (3·3%). However, for those of reproductive age at HSCT, 22% reported trying to conceive, with 10·3% reporting success. This study is the largest to date exploring sexual function in survivors of allo-HSCT. This data provides the basis for health service reform to better meet the needs of HSCT survivors, including evidence to support counselling and education both pre- and post-transplant.

    PMID: 26847746 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

pubmed: erectile dysfunction...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=Erectile dysfunction and Stem Cell Treatment
NCBI pubmed
  • Treatment of diabetes mellitus-induced erectile dysfunction using endothelial progenitor cells genetically modified with human telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    Treatment of diabetes mellitus-induced erectile dysfunction using endothelial progenitor cells genetically modified with human telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    Oncotarget. 2016 Jun 7;

    Authors: Zhang Y, Chen Z, Wang T, Yang J, Li R, Wang S, Liu J, Ye Z

    Abstract
    The efficacy of treatments for diabetes mellitus-induced erectile dysfunction (DMED) is quite poor, and stem cell therapy is emerging as a useful method. In this study, we used endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) overexpressing human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) for the treatment of DMED. Rat EPCs were transfected with hTERT (EPCs-hTERT). EPCs-hTERT secreted more growth factors and demonstrated enhanced proliferation and resistance to oxidative stress. Twenty-four male DMED rats were subjected to four treatments: DMED (DMED group), EPCs (EPCs group), EPCs transduced with control lentivirus (EPC-control group) and EPCs-hTERT (EPCs-hTERT group). A group of healthy rats were used as the normal control group. The erectile function in the EPCs-hTERT group was markedly increased compared with the EPCs and EPCs-control groups. The EPCs-hTERT group exhibited more growth factors, smooth muscle content and retained stem cells in penile tissues. The degree of apoptosis and collagen/smooth muscle ratio in penile tissues of the EPCs-hTERT group was considerably reduced. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression increased significantly in the EPCs-hTERT group. Taken together, these data showed that the enhanced paracrine effect, resistance to oxidative stress and proliferation of EPCs-hTERT may contribute to the improvements of erectile function in DMED rats.

    PMID: 27283992 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]