pubmed: erectile dysfunction...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=Erectile dysfunction and Stem Cell Therapy
NCBI pubmed
  • Antiplasmodial activity of Heinsia crinita (Rubiaceae) and identification of new iridoids.
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    Antiplasmodial activity of Heinsia crinita (Rubiaceae) and identification of new iridoids.

    J Ethnopharmacol. 2017 Jan 20;196:261-266

    Authors: Tshisekedi Tshibangu P, Mutwale Kapepula P, Kabongo Kapinga MJ, Tujibikila Mukuta A, Kalenda DT, Tchinda AT, Mouithys-Mickalad AA, Jansen O, Cieckiewicz E, Tits M, Angenot L, Frédérich M

    Abstract
    ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Heinsia crinita is used in traditional medicine for the treatment of febrile illness and erectile dysfunction. Its stem bark powder is found in some peripheral markets in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) as a remedy against malaria. Investigations were conducted on crude extracts of leaves, fruits and stem barks in view to validate their use and to determine which plant part possesses the best antiplasmodial properties.
    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Different plant parts were extracted with methanol, ethanol and dichloromethane. Based on the preliminary assays, the dichloromethane extract of the stem bark was subjected to fractionation using preparative HPLC system and column chromatography. This step led to the isolation of two new iridoids which had their structures elucidated by NMR, UV, MS and FT-IR spectroscopic techniques. Extracts and pure compounds were tested in vitro against the 3D7 strain of Plasmodium falciparum. The inhibition of the parasite growth was evaluated in vitro by colorimetric method (p-LDH assay) and their cytotoxicity evaluated in vitro against the human non-cancer fibroblast cell line (WI38) through WST1 assay. The in vivo antiplasmodial activity was assessed by the inhibition of Plasmodium berghei growth in infected mice treated with the ethanol extract of H. crinita stem bark at the concentrations of 200 and 300mg/Kg/day per os, using a protocol based on the 4-d suppressive test of Peters and compared to a non-treated negative control group of mice (growth =100%). Finally the antioxidant activity of the same extract was evaluated using ABTS, DPPH and cell-based assays.
    RESULTS: A moderate in vitro antiplasmodial activity was observed for the dichloromethane extract of the stem bark of H. crinita (IC50 =29.2±1.39µg/mL) and for the two new iridoids, lamalbide 6, 7, 8- triacetate (IC50 =16.39±0.43µg/mL) as well as for its aglycone lamiridosin 6, 7, 8-triacetate (IC50 =0.44.56±1.12µg/mL). The ethanolic stem bark extract (200 and 300mg/kg/day, oral route) showed a moderate in vivo antimalarial activity in Plasmodium berghei-infected mice with 27.84±2.75% and 48.54±3.76% of inhibition of the parasite growth, respectively (p<0.01).). This extract displayed high cellular antioxidant activity using dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFDA) on HL-60 monocytes. These crude extracts and pure compounds tested at the higher concentration of 100µg/mL did not show any cytotoxicity against WI38 cells.
    CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that H. crinita extracts possess antimalarial activity and contain some unusual iridoids with moderate antiplasmodial activity, therefore justifying to some extent its traditional use by the local population in DRC for this purpose. This is the first report of the isolation and antiplasmodial activity of these two new iridoids.

    PMID: 27890637 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

pubmed: erectile dysfunction...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=Erectile dysfunction and Stem Cell Treatment
NCBI pubmed
  • Implanted Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Erectile Dysfunction in a Rat Model of Type 2 Diabetes, but Their Repair Capacity Is Impaired by Their Prior Exposure to the Diabetic Milieu.
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    Implanted Muscle-Derived Stem Cells Ameliorate Erectile Dysfunction in a Rat Model of Type 2 Diabetes, but Their Repair Capacity Is Impaired by Their Prior Exposure to the Diabetic Milieu.

    J Sex Med. 2016 May;13(5):786-97

    Authors: Kovanecz I, Vernet D, Masouminia M, Gelfand R, Loni L, Aboagye J, Tsao J, Rajfer J, Gonzalez-Cadavid NF

    Abstract
    INTRODUCTION: Muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) and other SCs implanted into the penile corpora cavernosa ameliorate erectile dysfunction in type 1 diabetic rat models by replenishing lost corporal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and decreasing fibrosis. However, there are no conclusive data from models of type 2 diabetes (T2D) and obesity.
    AIM: To determine whether MDSCs from obese Zucker (OZ) rats with T2D at an early stage of diabetes (early diabetic SCs isolated and cultured in low-glucose medium [ED-SCs]) counteract corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction and corporal SMC loss or lipo-fibrosis when implanted in OZ rats at a late stage of diabetes and whether MDSCs from these OZ rats with late diabetes (late diabetic SCs isolated and cultured in high-glucose medium [LD-SC]) differ from ED-SCs in gene transcriptional phenotype and repair capacity.
    METHODS: ED-SCs and LD-SCs were compared by DNA microarray assays, and ED-SCs were incubated in vitro under high-glucose conditions (ED-HG-SC). These three MDSC types were injected into the corpora cavernosa of OZ rats with late diabetes (OZ/ED, OZ/LD, and OZ/ED-HG rats, respectively). Untreated OZ and non-diabetic lean Zucker rats functioned as controls. Two months later, rats were subjected to cavernosometry and the penile shaft and corporal tissues were subjected to histopathology and DNA microarray assays.
    MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: In vivo erectile dysfunction assessment by Dynamic Infusion Cavernosometry followed by histopathology marker analysis of the penile tissues.
    RESULTS: Implanted ED-SCs and ED-HG-SCs improved corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction, counteracted corporal decreases in the ratio of SMCs to collagen and fat infiltration in rats with long-term T2D, and upregulated neuronal and endothelial nitric oxide. LD-SCs acquired an inflammatory, pro-fibrotic, oxidative, and dyslipidemic transcriptional phenotype and failed to repair the corporal tissue.
    CONCLUSION: MDSCs from pre-diabetic rats injected into the corpora cavernosa of rats with long-term T2D improve corporal veno-occlusive dysfunction and the underlying histopathology. In contrast, MDSCs from rats with long-term uncontrolled T2D are imprinted by the hyperglycemic and dyslipidemic milieu with a noxious phenotype associated with an impaired tissue repair capacity. SCs affected by diabetes could lack tissue repair efficacy as autografts and should be reprogrammed in vitro or substituted by SCs from allogenic non-diabetic sources.

    PMID: 27114192 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]