pubmed: erectile dysfunction...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=Erectile dysfunction and Stem Cell Therapy
NCBI pubmed
  • Landmarks in erectile function recovery after radical prostatectomy.
    Related Articles

    Landmarks in erectile function recovery after radical prostatectomy.

    Nat Rev Urol. 2015 Apr 14;

    Authors: Weyne E, Castiglione F, Van der Aa F, Bivalacqua TJ, Albersen M

    Abstract
    The description of the nerve-sparing technique of radical prostatectomy by Walsh was one of the major breakthroughs in the surgical treatment of prostate cancer in the 20(th) century. However, despite this advance and consequent technological refinements to nerve-sparing surgery, a large proportion of men still suffer from erectile dysfunction (ED) as a complication of prostatectomy. A plethora of therapeutic approaches have been proposed to optimize erectile function recovery in these patients. Several preclinical and translational studies have shown benefits of therapies including PDE5 inhibitor (PDE5I) treatment, immunomodulation, neurotrophic factor administration, and regenerative techniques, such as stem cell therapy, in animal models. However, most of these approaches have either failed to translate to clinical use or have yet to be studied in human subjects. Penile rehabilitation with PDE5Is is currently the most commonly used clinical strategy, in spite of the absence of solid clinical evidence to support its use.

    PMID: 25868558 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]

pubmed: erectile dysfunction...
NCBI: db=pubmed; Term=Erectile dysfunction and Stem Cell Treatment
NCBI pubmed
  • Use of nanoparticles to monitor human mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into penile cavernosum of rats with erectile dysfunction.
    Related Articles

    Use of nanoparticles to monitor human mesenchymal stem cells transplanted into penile cavernosum of rats with erectile dysfunction.

    Korean J Urol. 2015 Apr;56(4):280-7

    Authors: Kim JH, Lee HJ, Doo SH, Yang WJ, Choi D, Kim JH, Won JH, Song YS

    Abstract
    PURPOSE: This study was performed to examine the treatment of erectile dysfunction by use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles-labeled human mesenchymal stem cells (SPION-MSCs) transplanted into the cavernous nerve injured cavernosa of rats as monitored by molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
    MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eight-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups of 10 rats each: group 1, sham operation; group 2, cavernous nerve injury; group 3, SPION-MSC treatment after cavernous nerve injury. Immediately after the cavernous nerve injury in group 3, SPION-MSCs were injected into the cavernous nerve injured cavernosa. Serial T2-weighted MRI was done immediately after injection and at 2 and 4 weeks. Erectile response was assessed by cavernous nerve stimulation at 2 and 4 weeks.
    RESULTS: Prussian blue staining of SPION-MSCs revealed abundant uptake of SPION in the cytoplasm. After injection of 1×10(6) SPION-MSCs into the cavernosa of rats, T2-weighted MRI showed a clear hypointense signal induced by the injection. The presence of SPION in the corpora cavernosa was confirmed with Prussian blue staining. At 2 and 4 weeks, rats with cavernous nerve injury had significantly lower erectile function than did rats without cavernous nerve injury (p<0.05). The group transplanted with SPION-MSCs showed higher erectile function than did the group without SPION-MSCs (p<0.05). The presence of SPION-MSCs for up to 4 weeks was confirmed by MRI imaging and Prussian blue staining in the corpus cavernosa.
    CONCLUSIONS: Transplanted SPION-MSCs existed for up to 4 weeks in the cavernous nerve injured cavernosa of rats. Erectile dysfunction recovered and could be monitored by MRI.

    PMID: 25874041 [PubMed - in process]

  • Prospects of stem cell treatment in benign urological diseases.
    Related Articles

    Prospects of stem cell treatment in benign urological diseases.

    Korean J Urol. 2015 Apr;56(4):257-265

    Authors: Alwaal A, Hussein AA, Lin CS, Lue TF

    Abstract
    Stem cells (SCs) are undifferentiated cells that are capable of self-renewal and differentiation and that therefore contribute to the renewal and repair of tissues. Their capacity for division, differentiation, and tissue regeneration is highly dependent on the surrounding environment. Several preclinical and clinical studies have utilized SCs in urological disorders. In this article, we review the current status of SC use in benign urological diseases (erectile dysfunction, Peyronie disease, infertility, and urinary incontinence), and we summarize the results of the preclinical and clinical trials that have been conducted.

    PMID: 25874038 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]